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UNTITLED

1996–
Ink on paper
12 in. × 16 in. × 56 ft.
 
 
Collection of Rene & Veronica di Rosa Foundation, Napa, CA and
Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley, CA

Untitled

Untitled

Untitled


SELF-PORTRAIT

1997–
Steel, ink on paper
4 in. × 88 in. × 20 ft.
 
 
Extended Loan to Ballett Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

Shipping crate used for transport to Frankfurt:

Self-Portrait


UNTITLED (Minuet in MG)

1999–
MG Midget (1974), steel, paper, plastic, concrete
15 in. × 26 in. × 65 ft.
 
 
The seven-story tall sculpture, Untitled (Minuet in MG),
contains a 1974 MG Midget sportscar that was donated,
shredded, steamrolled, photographed, bagged, labeled,
numbered, and filed by weight from heaviest to lightest
in milligrams (mgs) — an MG in mgs.
 
The sculpture now holds the Guinness World Record for the
“tallest file cabinet on earth,” and the DMV registration
for the shredded car filed inside the cabinet officially
indicates possession by its owner.
 
 
Collection of Rene & Veronica di Rosa Foundation, Napa, CA

Untitled (Minuet in MG)

Untitled (Minuet in MG)

Untitled (Minuet in MG)

Untitled (Minuet in MG)

Untitled (Minuet in MG)

Untitled (Minuet in MG)


ROW B, PLOT 33

1999–
Dirt, concrete, undeclared object
36 in. × 96 in. × 108 in.

 
The sculpture, Row B, Plot 33, is composed of 6 tons of dirt
removed from a cemetery plot that was purchased in Shasta,
California and transported to a gallery in San Francisco, California.
 
The dirt was tamped into 1 ft. square bricks and assembled on
the gallery floor as a literal real estate transaction: the artist
bought a plot of land and took it home.
 
In addition, the cemetery deed, officially registered with
Siskiyou County, now indicates the owner of the land—which
is also a sculpture.
 
Private Collection, San Francisco, CA

Row B, Plot 33

Cemetery plot where the dirt was removed:

Row B, Plot 33


BIG PICTURE FRAME

1999—
Steel, glass, vinyl, durst lambda
48 in. × 96 in. × 96 in.
 
 
The sculpture, Big Picture Frame, contains a full-scale bus shelter
advertising an anonymous campaign for self-identity.
 
Described by one art critic as “waiting for Godot in cyberspace,”
the internet domain registration officially links the sculpture
to its owner.
 
Collection of San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA),
San Francisco, CA

Big Picture Frame


VERN

1999–
Cremated remains on canvas
1 3/4 in. × 21 in. × 47 in.
 
 
The painting, Vern, is composed of the cremated remains of an
unrecognized painter named Vernon Koski, who aspired to be
in a museum during his lifetime and now hangs in the permanent
collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
(SFMOMA).
 
Koski’s lifelong dream came true when his wife answered a
classified advertisement to “Donate Your Ashes To Art; Let Your
Loved One Live On.”
 
An independent documentary film has been made about
the life of Vernon Koski; it helps to expand the painting’s
romantic turn-of-events by allowing Koski’s artwork — seen in
the film — to reach a wider audience after his death.
 
In addition, every time the painting travels — even temporarily —
an application, permit, and affidavit must be filed with
the county to identify its current location. Thus, one additional
page is added to Koski’s death certificate each time the painting
travels, leaving an official paper trail of current and previous
locations of the artwork.
 
[ Full Story ]
 
 
Collection of San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA),
San Francisco, CA

Vern

Newspaper advertisement:

Vern

Modified death certificate, new final resting place:

Vern

Vern

Permit to transport, modify death certificate:

Vern


THE COLOR OF PALO ALTO

2001–
Mixed media
26 sq. mi. × 365 days
 
 
Commissioned by the City of Palo Alto Public Art Commission  
 

Early paint can mock-up, 2001-2003:

The Color of Palo Alto

Early data visualizations using maps, 2001-2003:

The Color of Palo Alto

Early data visualizations using paint to create paintings, 2001-2003:

The Color of Palo Alto

"The Color of Palo Alto" created the nation's first photo-assisted 9-1-1 emergency response system,
pioneering and popularizing citywide, street-level digital photography in Silicon Valley starting in 2001
(six years before Google Street View).

A working prototype of the system was built in October 2003 and presented to the
California GIS Conference, San Jose, CA in February 2004, showing the possibility,
affordability, and usefulness of citywide, street-level digital photography for City Planning,
Public Works, Disaster Assessment, Emergency Response, Real Estate, etc.

Chronology of Citywide Street-Level Photography in Silicon Valley:

      2001 - The Color of Palo Alto

                - 2001 Public proposal to City of Palo Alto

                - 2002 Fundraising, public presentations

                - 2003 Working prototype of photo-assisted 9-1-1 emergency response system, exhibition, press

                - 2004 Demonstration of 9-1-1 and GIS system to California GIS Conference, San Jose, CA;
                 "Best Art Project in Bay Area" by San Francisco Magazine, other press, etc.;
                 Public installation with explanatory display located in City Hall Plaza at 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto;
                 First meeting with VP at soon-to-be-launched Google Maps in 2004 explaining learnings
                 and usefulness of the citywide photographs from "The Color of Palo Alto" to the GIS and 9-1-1 system
                 (second meeting after Google Maps launch in 2005)

                - For years, it was common knowledge in Palo Alto that an artist was going around the city taking photographs
                 of every property with a digital camera, for very little money, and had discovered how useful such photographs
                 could be when tied into the City's GIS; this drew interest from local tech companies, justifying their own
                 investment in and experiments with such systems

      2005 - Amazon A9 Block View

                - Headquartered at 450 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto (two blocks away from "The Color of Palo Alto"
                 at 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto) Amazon A9 staff stopped by "The Color of Palo Alto" explanatory display,
                 located in City Hall Plaza, during the previous year on their way to lunch at Whole Foods, for example)

      2006 - Microsoft Streetside

      2007 - Google Street View

Photo-assisted 9-1-1 system presented to the California GIS Conference, San Jose, CA in February 2004:

The Color of Palo Alto

3D model of portable solar garage:

The Color of Palo Alto

Built and installed, the portable solar garage charges the electric scooter inside and is used as a laboratory:

The Color of Palo Alto

Electric scooter and mounted chromoscope used for data sampling:

The Color of Palo Alto

The entire City of Palo Alto displayed A to Z, January to December, on the front of City Hall:

The Color of Palo Alto

First window panel starts with Winter, January, and A Streets, includes 1st, 10th, and 35th streets, alphabetically:

The Color of Palo Alto

Detail of entire city:

The Color of Palo Alto

Installation on City Hall:

The Color of Palo Alto

The Color of Palo Alto

The Color of Palo Alto

The Color of Palo Alto

The Color of Palo Alto

The Color of Palo Alto

The Color of Palo Alto

The Color of Palo Alto

The final average colors of the entire City of Palo Alto in HSV:

The Color of Palo Alto

HSV was invented in Palo Alto at XeroxPARC: it is the hometown color space:

The Color of Palo Alto

Sample average colors of seasons:

The Color of Palo Alto

Sample average colors of dates:

The Color of Palo Alto

Sample average colors of months (shows cloudy Winter skies (white), clear Summer skies (blue), in Mode of Modes):

The Color of Palo Alto

Sample average colors of neighborhoods:

The Color of Palo Alto

Sample average colors of streets that begin with the letter "H":

The Color of Palo Alto

Sample average colors of parcels:

The Color of Palo Alto

Sample plaid based on four average City colors in HSV:

The Color of Palo Alto

GPS path around Palo Alto, January to December:

The Color of Palo Alto

The Color of Palo Alto

"The Color of Palo Alto" Paint Cans - Mode of Means, Mean of Means, Mean of Modes, 2008:

The Color of Palo Alto







Copyright 1996–2014 Samuel Yates. “The Color of Palo Alto” is a trademark of Samuel Yates.

The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.

The artist shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.